Tuesday, 24 May 2022 00:00

When the skin on your heels is allowed to become overly dry, rough, and thick, this can sometimes set the stage for cracked heels to develop. That is because when the weight of the body bears down—and the heel naturally spreads out—this callused, inflexible skin can crack. If cracked heels (heel fissures) are left untreated, they can deepen, become painful, and possibly even bleed or become infected. The best way to treat cracked heels is to avoid getting them at all. Applying topical emollients or occlusive moisturizers at night and covering your feet with socks can help seal in moisture and keep the heel hydrated. Also, gently massaging the heels with a pumice stone may help to smooth out mildly cracked heels, but this practice is not advised for people with diabetes or nerve damage. If your heels are badly cracked, red, painful, bleeding, or you believe they may be infected, it is suggested you contact a podiatrist to receive professional care.


 

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Dennis Grandy, DPM from California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sacramento, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Women are more prone to developing bunions than men. This may be a result of wearing high heels or shoes that do not have adequate room in the toe area. A bunion appears as a bony lump on the side of the big toe and is considered to be a foot deformity. This protrusion causes the bone in the big toe to gradually move toward the other toes and can produce pain and discomfort. People who develop bunions may eventually get osteoarthritis in the big toe, which can be the source of chronic pain. Additionally, the risk of getting a bunion may increase in patients who have short calf muscles or a shortened Achilles tendon, and medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and flat feet. Bunions may be prevented by wearing shoes that are comfortable and flat. It may help to frequently walk barefoot, which may be beneficial in strengthening the muscles in the overall foot. If you have developed a bunion, it is strongly suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can provide you with correct treatment options, which may include surgery for permanent removal. 

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Dennis Grandy, DPM of California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sacramento, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

Usually, a broken toe is not a serious foot condition, despite the fact it can cause severe pain and discomfort. Common ways to break a toe include jamming it against a piece of furniture or dropping a heavy object on it. Many patients notice immediate pain, bruising and swelling, and the affected toe is often difficult to move. In severe fractures, the toe may protrude at an uncomfortable angle, and may require an aggressive form of treatment. The bone may need to be moved back into place, and this is referred to as reduction. Relief may be found when the broken toe is taped to the toe next to it, which can provide the stability that is necessary as the healing process occurs. This method, referred to as buddy taping, is fairly easy to accomplish. Surgery may be a viable treatment option if the break is severe, in addition to possible wearing a cast that can provide added support. If you have broken a toe, you may with to visit a podiatrist for a complete examination and treatment options.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dennis Grandy, DPM from California. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sacramento, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 03 May 2022 00:00

If one’s diabetes is not carefully managed through diet, exercise, and insulin treatment, an all-too-common complication can be a foot ulcer. Ulcers develop because skin tissue breaks down and layers of skin underneath are exposed due to poor circulation, high blood sugar, nerve damage, and irritated or hurt feet. Foot ulcers usually develop under big toes or the balls of the feet. Symptoms to watch for are unusual swelling, irritation, redness, discoloration, drainage from the foot, and odors emanating from the feet. The most visible sign of a foot ulcer is when black tissue (known as “eschar”) surrounds the ulcer because of poor blood flow to the area. However, signs of a foot ulcer are not always present or obvious. Good foot care, including wearing properly fitting, quality shoes, maintaining good foot hygiene, proper trimming of toenails, as well as attention paid to other aspects of physical health, such as heart and kidney disease and obesity, can help with the prevention of foot ulcers. Treatment depends on the cause and severity of the ulcer. It is highly suggested to consult with a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and to obtain a treatment plan.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dennis Grandy, DPM from California. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sacramento, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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